Blog : Twitter

Sonoma State University – Social Media & Wine Marketing resources

Sonoma State University – Social Media & Wine Marketing resources

The following resources were promised to attended the Social Media & Wine Marketing today at Sonoma State University’s Wine Business Institute

How to get more out of Twitter by Posting Images Better

How to get more out of Twitter by Posting Images Better

Many of you are posting Twitter images. Whether the images are yours or were created by a third party, you can get more bang for your buck by utilizing a rarely used Twitter function on both your computer and phone.

Below is a step-by-step guide to show you how you can get more reach out of your current photo posts.

How to tag images on TwitterPlease note that this currently only works on native Twitter – computer or phone – and not on third party platforms such as Hootsuite, or in the Twitter Ad Platform.

1. Click the Quill / Tweet Icon in the upper right corner of your Twitter account.
2. Click the Camera icon and add your image(s) – up to 4 images can be added per tweet.
3. Type in your tweet content in the “Compose new Tweet” box (computer) or the “What’s happening?“ space (phone).
4. When you have the option to add “Who’s in this photo?” (you’ll find this option below the image(s) on your phone) you can add up to 10 accounts, the maximum number that Twitter currently allows. These images need to be added one-by-one by typing the relevant Twitter account names in and clicking on them as it auto-populates below.
5. Once you have all the accounts that you want tagged in the photo(s) inputted hit the Tweet button.

1 Add Text Then Click Add Photo Twitter Images
1. Add Text Then Click Add Photo

 

2 With Photo Added Click Who's in this photo Twitter Images
2. With Photo Added Click Who’s in this photo

 

3 Tag Relevant Twitter Account Twitter Images
3. Tag Relevant Twitter Account

 

4 Tags Show and others account get notification of tag Twitter Images
4. Tags show and others account get notification of tag

Some pointers for you:

– The maximum image size that twitter will accept for upload is 5MB and up to 3MB for animated GIF’s
– Twitter prefers images in Landscape format with the aspect ratio 2:1. Images in Portrait format need to be clicked by the user to be fully seen
– Where possible add a geo-location to your image so that in the future it can be geo-searched at that specific location
– Find more info on posting photos to Twitter here

For a deeper article on Twitter photos you can read this piece on Twitter

A 2013 piece from the Buffer Blog gives some good tips on how to maximize the impact of photo use in your Twitter account. You can find the post here

Cricket World Cup 2015 – Social Media Rankings

Cricket World Cup 2015 – Social Media Rankings

The 11th Cricket World Cup is well and truly underway in Australia and New Zealand with two groups of 7 vying for quarter-final places, the top four from each group going through. While the ICC has compiled “scientific” rankings for ODI here we decided that we needed to create a Social Media (CWCSM) ranking system for the 14 teams at the World Cup.

There are many variable factors that we have been unable to take it account as follows;

  • Connectivity – how “digitally” connected a particular country is
  • Popularity – whether cricket is the most popular sport in a particularly country
  • Economic status

We’ll present a number of different rankings below and you can make your mind up on who you think is the number 1 ranked team at the World Cup on Social Media based on our numbers

 

World Cup Cricket Social Media Ranking Table

How did we work it all out?

  • Facebook – divided the teams Facebook page fans by the countries population and assigned ranking points the same as the percentage of fans to population.
  • Twitter – divided the teams Twitter accounts followers by the countries population and assigned ranking points the same as the percentage of fans to population.
  • Instagram – divided the teams Instagram accounts followers by the countries population and assigned ranking points the same as the percentage of fans to population. An additional 1 (one) point was added to all teams with an Instagram account as percentages were low.
  • Klout – We averaged out all of the teams Klout Scores (71.5 is the average). Those in excess of this average were given the difference is ranking points. Those lower than the average were given 1 (one) ranking point if their Klout score was within 10 points of the average.
  • Kred – We averaged out all of the teams Klout Scores (890 is the average). Those in excess of this average were given the difference is ranking points. Those lower than the average were given 5 (five) rankings point if their Kred score was within 100 points of the average.

It’s not the most scientific analysis of the teams Social Media presences but gives a fair idea of where they stand relative to each other on a pretty even playing field.

Some highlights and interesting bits and pieces;

Australia – Number 1 in both CWCSM and ODI Rankings

India – Number 2 in both CWCSM and ODI Rankings. Their 21 million plus Facebook fans not enough to take them to number 1 as that makes up only 1.81% of their population

Ireland – punching above their ODI ranking of 12 with a CWCSM ranking of number 8

U.A.E. – barely registering with a CWCSM ranking of 14 and 0.04 ranking points

New Zealand – one of the host countries, has over 600,00 Facebook fans, an impressive 13.4% of their total population in a country where cricket plays second fiddle to rugby

England – scored impressively on Instagram with 50,800 followers but this is still only 0.10% of their total population

Scotland – ranked above a test playing nation in Zimbabwe and and are just behind another in Pakistan.

 

fbWant to follow the teams on Facebook? Here’s the list of pages that we used for our figures –

AfghanistanAustraliaBangladeshEnglandIndiaIrelandNew ZealandPakistanScotlandSri LankaSouth Africa UAEWest IndiesZimbabwe

Master list here

 

twitterWant to follow the teams on Twitter? Here’s the list of pages that we used for our figures –

AfghanistanAustraliaBangladeshEnglandIndiaIrelandNew ZealandPakistanScotlandSri LankaSouth AfricaUAEWest Indies Zimbabwe

Master list here

 

instagramWant to follow the teams on Instagram? Here’s the list of pages that we used for our figures –

AfghanistanAustraliaBangladeshEngland – IrelandNew ZealandPakistanScotland – South Africa – West Indies 

 

2015_Cricket_World_Cup_Logo.svg

Follow the ICC World Cup on their Social Media outlets here

FacebookTwitterInstagram

 

 

 

The Small Print

  • Facebook Numbers – taken between 9.45am – 9.49am (California Time) on Sunday 15th February 2015
  • Twitter Numbers – taken between 9.52am – 10.01am (California Time) on Sunday 15th February 2015
  • Instagram Numbers – taken between 10.59am – 11.14am (California Time) on Monday 16th February 2015
  • Klout Numbers – taken between 9.52am – 10.01am (California Time) on Sunday 15th February 2015
  • Kred Numbers – taken between 9.52am – 10.01am (California Time) on Sunday 15th February 215
  • Population Numbers – the most recent population number for each team / country was taken from Wikipedia.org
  • Missing Numbers – not every team is on every Social Media outlet. We have tried our best to find every account but it appears, particularly on Instagram, that not all teams have a presence.
  • Outlets chosen – Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. We had to draw the line somewhere and while many teams have additional Social Media presences on Google +, Tumblr, YouTube, Flickr and others these 3 are the most used by both competing teams and Social Media users.
  • Ranking Sites Chosen – Klout and Kred. We wanted to try and get a balance of ranking across platforms. We don’t have a big budget for this so we used Klout and Kred that use differing ranking criteria.

This was written by 3 rock marketing’s Chief Social Officer, Andrew Healy, a keen fan of Cricket Ireland and Vice President of the Napa Valley Cricket Club.

Did we miss anything? Make a mistake? Let us know at – andrewjhealy@gmail.com –

World Cup Cricket Social Media

Do’s and Dont’s on Twitter – 3 of each

Do’s and Dont’s on Twitter – 3 of each

Twitter is here to stay. While Facebook lends itself to long explanations, pictures and every discernible fact you could ever want to know about someone, Twitter is its more succinct alternative. You’ve got 140 characters to figure out what you want to say. These days of instant gratification and with letter writing dead and gone, Twitter is where it’s at!

 That being said here are some helpful Do’s and Don’ts to help you tackle this brave new world.

Do RT (re-tweet) followers

Twitter is a mutual experience. You RT followers and they will RT you, if you have something to say! A good rule of thumb is 1/3 Native tweets (your own) 1/3 RT’s and 1/3 direct responses to followers. It keeps your account active and dynamic. Who wants to read the same stuff over and over again? By mixing it up with RT’s from like-minded followers you can help spread YOUR voice as well.

Do Be Consistent

Followers will forget about you unless you keep yourself in their feed. Let them know they can expect you to tweet something. When a twitter account has super low activity, they are the first to go when people are cleaning who they are following. If you are a business you should have things to say and be engaging on a pretty consistent basis. With larger accounts tweeting hourly throughout the day makes sense, as there is a lot of information to share and conversation to be part of. Small accounts two to three times a day is sufficient. Assess what works for you, but be consistent!

Do have a clear voice

It is hugely important that your followers know who they are following. What is it you want to say? Are you a business? Keep personal stuff out of it, but still keep your personality! What do you want your followers to know? What can they expect when they read your tweets? Think about how you want to enhance your image and be consistent in your tone.

Don’t tweet from Facebook

It just looks lazy. “Check out this great article from Charles so and so as he expl…fb.me/vt51Z”. Your followers are looking for you to tell them something. A half formed thought or phrase is hard (and annoying) to read when going through your feed. Then consider how hard that is to RT. If you are going to have a Twitter account, especially as a business, it is important to utilize all avenues of social media appropriately and in ways they were intended. Have your voice heard (in 140 characters or less) in an original way and respect your followers.

Don’t Over Hash-Tag

Two or three is sufficient to get your idea across and pick up on searches.  #Over #hashtagging #is #distracting and it’s also hard to read and unnecessary.  Making up hashtags that mean nothing to people just takes up space. See what topics are trending and join the conversation! Have fun with your hash-tagging but don’t ruin it for the rest of us.

Don’t try to use up all 140 characters

So you’re thinking ‘hey! 140 characters isn’t that much! I’ve got stuff to say!’ Well yeah. But don’t you want others to help you say it too? When they re-tweet (RT) and you’re at your limit already then they have to do some crafting. You always want to try to avoid having someone edit what you’ve written. You know what you wanted to say! So help them spread your word but keeping it as clear and short as possible. Add a bitly to link them to more information!